About your Search

20121001
20121031
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 71
LANGUAGE
English 71
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)
national security threats, warning their technology equipment could be used for spying. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. it's that time of year again, earnings season, we look at what wall street's expecting from third quarter results. >> tom: and speaking of seasons, it's already looking a lot like christmas for the nation's retailers. this year could be the best ever for online holiday shopping. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: two of china's top telecommunications companies are a threat to u.s. national security. that's the conclusion of the u.s. house intelligence committee after a year-long investigation into emerging technology giants z.t.e. and huawei. huawei says the report relies on rumors and speculation, and the company warns a trade battle could cost the jobs of thousands of workers in the united states. but, as darren gersh reports, there is growing bipartisan agreement that this is the right time to get tough on chinese cyber-theft. >> reporter: in unusually blunt language the bipartisan leadership of the house committee warned u.s. companies not to buy their br
, buying majority control of the u.s. cell company. and with nearly one-in-three americans working contract or part-time jobs. we kick off a week-long look at how a nation of freelancers is changing our labor force. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a u-turn on wall street today. stocks rose, rebounding from sell-offs last week. good news about the american consumer put investors in a buying mood. the dow jumped 95 points, the nasdaq rose 20 and the s&p 500 up 11. retail sales rose more than 1% in september, which was better than expected. it follows an even bigger gain in august and its the best back- to-back showing since 2010. erika miller has a closer look at the data and what consumers were loading up on last month. >> reporter: it seems pretty unbelievable. but a single electronic devices appears to have powered the gain in u.s. retail sales last month. if you haven't guessed it, we're talking about the iphone 5. a remarkable five million of them were sold in their first weekend alone. and that appears to have boosted electronics sales by 4.5% in september. that was the biggest incre
because every four years they rediscover us, hispani hispanics, and then they forget about us for three years and then they rediscover us again. >> announcer: funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the coalberg foundation, independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation, a john and poly guff fund. the cla meant foundation, park foundation. dedicated to heightening public awareness to public issues. the herb al per the foundation. their mission is to promote compassion in our society. the john d. and kathryn t. mcarthur foundation committed to building a more just, and peaceful world. more information at mak found.org. the bess see and jessie fink foundation. the h.k.h. foundation. barbara g. fleischmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized, individual, and group retirement products. that's kwl we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. millions of us were waiting this week for mitt romney and barack obama to co
the campaigns are investing in battleground state >> brown: then, speaking of big money, paat solman walks us through those trillions of dollars spent by the u.s. government each year.n >> reporter: what you might not know about the federal deficit. a guided tour in and around washington, d.c. with the "wall street journal's" david wesson. >> woodruff: we have another in our series of topics not being talked about in the campaign. tonight's missinissue is europe's debt crisis. >> brown: an ancient and historic city at risk in a modern-day civil war.is we look at the destruction in aleppo, syria. >> this is one of the great tragedies. aleppo's an extraordinary cross roads of cultures, religions, all built on aro strata of centuries of --t >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a 19th century recording made on tinfoil by thomas edison, digitally converted so we can hear it. >> brown: th's all ahead on tonight's newshour. 's major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soo
prosperous middle east allied with us. i hope this hope but hope is not a strategy. >> woodruff: with that mitt romney took aim at foreign policy today in a speech at virginia military institute in lexington, virginia. >> when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region and with violent extremists on the march and with an american ambassador and three others dead likely at the hands of al qaeda affiliates it's clear that the risk of conflict in the region is higher now than when the president took office. >> woodruff: that last point involved the assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi libya and the death of ambassador chris stevens on the night of september 11. the administration initially blamed an anti-muslim film for inciting the trouble. more recently officials have said new information indicates it was a terrorist attack. today romney again criticized the president's response in libya. >> i want to be very clear. the blame for the murder of our people in libya
into security failures at the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we head to colorado, where the presidential candidates are targeting suburban voters. >> some of the things romney supports, i don't think are conducive to women's issues and as a business owner, i don't think obama is a good choice. >> ifill: outrage in pakistan, after an outspoken 14-year-old was shot by the taliban for promoting education for girls. >> woodruff: and we examine new evidence that lance armstrong was at the center of a sophisticated professional doping program, including testimony from his former teammates. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the supreme court heard arguments today in one of the most closely watched cases of the term. it marked a return to the decades-long legal debate over affirmative action
that's right before we go into the fiscal cliff debate in the u.s. the fed is going to be very concerned about that and put out a very tough stress test on the banks. we'll see what happens, but i think it could be yet again a little bit disappointed for what we hoped for in terms of dividends. > dividends. >> susan: we're going to have to leave it there. any disclosures, fred, on the stocks you talked about? >> no. thanks. great to be on with you, susie. >> susan: thanks, have a great weekend. fred cannon. >. >> i'm diane eastabrook in chicago. still ahead, is the housing market ready to rally? i'll tell you what one expert thinks. >> susie: american consumers are feeling pretty good about the economy. the university of michigan's latest reading on consumer sentiment hit a five-year high. that comes as the treasury reports the u.s. budget deficit topped $1 trillion in fiscal 2012. that's our fourth-largest budget deficit since world war two. that held wall street's gains in check: the dow rose 2.5 points, the nasdaq fell five. the s&p down four. for the week, the major avera
or more job creation. it's not just about preventing a debt crisis from turning us into europe. it is about what kind of country we're going to be, what kind of people we're going to be. >> woodruff: and the obama campaign turned to former president clinton in a new web video charging the romney tax plan favors the wealthy. >> i know how this works. because i'm one of those folks. if i get governor romney's 20% income tax cut, you can take away my home mortgage deduction, my charitable deduction, my deduction for state and local taxes, and any other taxes that i have and i will still get a tax cut. >> woodruff: meanwhile debate arrangements were concluding at hofstra university on long island where 80 undecided vote voters, selected by gallup, will fill these seats. candy crowley, cnn's chief political correspondent, will moderate. in that role, she's selecting from questions submitted by the audience in advance. individual voters will ask their question. each candidate will get two minutes to respond. and just this afternoon, the commission on presidential debates announced a
all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost fo
estimates. yes, google's search engine continues to see more use, but the prices google charges for its core search advertisement product fell. the number of times visitors clicked on search ads was up 33%, but the prices advertisers paid for those clks was downe 15%. >> the inventory how it goes the more clicks there are going to be, the lower it will cost people at the end of the day. >> then there's google's newest division >> tom: then there's google's ision, motorola mobility. in may, google spentis $12.5 billion for motorola's cell pho psiness. while motorola added more than $2.5 billion in sales in its first full quarter with google, s.the division still lost money, more than a half-billion dollars. because the news wasn't expected until after the close tonight, trading in google shares was halted for two and a half hours. it restarted with less than an hour before the closing bell, and the stock fell 8%, closinggh at a five-week low. james dix covers google as an analyst at wedbush morgan. james dix ins us at the nasdaq. i want to start with the ad rates, four quarters s row google
to this week in northern california. joining us is lisaif krueger, science reporter. and regional political reporter. and cory cook, political scientist. cory, let's start with you you teachyohis stuff, you study thea stuff. tell us, what are we seeing tha is so new this t year? >> i think the sheer amount of money we're talking about is new. you had in september alone both tt romney and president obama raised the most money individually than the two candidates spent in 2004 combined. on the presidential level, we're talking about 2 or 3 billion spent for a local election, magnitudes increase over previous years. >> give us the roots. >> a lot comes from outside roups. ourro new campaign finance syst encourages groups to spend money despite the campaigns. american crossroads is an organization started by car carl rove which allows them to runny tv commercials they want, but they also have a group gps, a nonrofit dedicated to social welfare, which means they don't even have to disclose where the money comes from. half a billion right now is just from organizations. >> part of the organizati
heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investing billions of dollars in r&d around the globe to have the heart of tomorrow's innovations. by investing today in technologicalled advances here at intel, we can help make a better tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to l
. that includes consumer and capital lending, and the commercial market, which is much smaller than it used to be, and there are other components in the mix. my hope is this new c.e.o. and its team focus on what they have, avoid a lot of the noise going forward, and maybe coax investors back into the stock. because it has been a very difficult story. >> what about the stock? it was up sharply today. would you buy citi at $30 a share? >> yes. >> is this is turnaround story? >> no. i think it is a speculative story for the simple reason it hasn't been rewarding investors for the risk. you need a big dividend, and a bit more stability in the stock before you can recommend it to retail investor, compared to jp morgan. if you had to choose between the two, you would put them in morgan. >> do you have any disclosures to make, chris? do you own any of these bank stocks? >> no, i don't. i am a banker, but i don't have any personal holdings or any other management. >> great to have you on the show. chris whalen. >> he is author of "bull by the horns," about her front-row experience during the credit crash
, we look at the stepped-up cyber attacks on u.s. banks by iranian hackers. >> warner: we have a battleground dispatch from new hampshire, where the focus is on women voters and women candidates. >> it does seem striking, having all women, potentially, be the representatives to washington, and also potentially sitting as the executive of the state. >> woodruff: on the daily download, ray suarez talks with lauren ashrn and howard kurtz a about debate watchers using twitter and other social media. >> warner: and gwen ifill sits down with author ted widmer. he's been listening to once-secret tape recordings by president john f. kennedy. >> it's really a remarkable chance for the american people to hear what it is like to be president in a very visceral way. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can
time in three sessions, u.s. stocks suffered a sharp sell-off. prices fell as weak finance l results from corporate americal fed fear about the global economy. at the closing bell, the dow shed 243 points, the nasdaq lost 26.5, the s&p dropped almost 21 points, sending markets to levels not seen since early september. the heavy selling came after everal household names reported weak quarterly financial reports and lowered their expectations for the rest of the year. 3-m, dupont, and xerox wereev among those releasing disappointing results. erika miller reports worries about revenues have cast a shadow over the profit picture.h >> reporter: yes, it's earnings season. but earnings are not the most important indicator this quarter. it's revenues-- how much money a company makes before expenses. >> profits can go down, profits can go up. sales, you want to see nice steady growth. and when you are seeing big drops in revenues and revenue misses, that's definitely a red flag. >> reporter: in the latest quarter, a slew of big name firms have reported higher earnings but lower renues,en incl
u.s. economy picks up steam thanks to sp. ding by consumers and the government. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. we take you to a wells fargo event in chicago, where housing grants could turn renters into buyers. >> tom: then, from tax hikes to corporate earnings worries,o tonight's "market monitor" guest says investors are facing a cliff of concern. robert stovall of wood asset manament joins us. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."!me >> tom: the u.s. economy actually sped up in the third quarter, surprising economists and maybe you too. thanks to a pick-up in spending by conumers, the federal government and the housing c sector, the gross domestic product grew at a 2% annual rate in july through september. that 2% pace was stronger than expected and much better than what the economy experienced in the second quarter. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at the data and what it suggests about the economy the final months of this year. >> reporter: an economy growing at a 2% annual rate is hardly anything to celebrate. sure it could've been worse. but, clearly at three-years post gr
hours. we're happy to have with us now alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld. >> welcome back to nightly business report. baseed on how alcoa did in the third quarter, how do you think business will be for you for the rest of this year and going into 2013? >> well, it's a miktsed word out there. there's a lot of volatility. we see in the end markets that we confirm, the aluminum market is going to be about growth six percent. we took is down a notch from seven percent. as you just said, this is a decade where aluminum demand has doubled. there's high growth also here in the u.s. and we've seen that in the aerospace industry, very, very nice. we're seeing it in the u.s. automotive segment, very nice, and then there are on the other side -- i mean, coming down. we've seen the heavy truck segment coming down substantially, pretty much in the u.s., and building and constructions on the commercial building and construction side, there's still very little signs of life there. >> susie: you know wha, are your calculus telling you? we hear how businesses are weighed down by uncertainty. are they puting i
contenders will meet again in new york on tuesday. joining us for the debate later tonight and here now to preview what to expect are two familiar faces syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. >> well, if you look at the polls after the first debate, then it's magnified in part because of the way the democrats reacted, a pollster told my friend e.j. dionne that when republicans hate a poll they want to kill the posters, when democrats hate a poll they want to kill themselves. so they've been reacting with this emotion which has been magnifyed with the effect and so the momentum for romney roy ryeian has continued. so this is the night you will either accelerate that momentum or reverse it. >> republicans, judy, who just ten days ago were savaging all polls as part of the ann sister liberal conspiracy to discourage the romney ryan are now trumpeting them. every survey that comes out there's no question there's been a total change in morale in the two -- in into t entire campaign. >> woodruff: just in a week. >> just in a week. the president didn't s
". joining us now with more on those yahoo numbers, colin gillis, senior technology analyst at b.g.c. >> sokolin, where they were up why date on that analyst call this afternoon, what is he going to do, and dow buy into it? >> yeah, the wheels did not come off the bus on yahoo! and that was very rs.ouraging for inves this is a company that still is facing some significant challenges. revenue was flat. they're still struggling to find growth but she did paint the clear message that we all like about how she wanvgoing to turn around, focusing in on the opportunities on search, making sure she brings in employees and trying to chase after the mobile opportunities as well. >> you know, everybody talks about monetizing mobilere. >> you know, listen, when su have the quantity of the users that yahoo! has that is its largest asset. you talk about north of 700 million worldwide, use month so m yes, if you are building good psducts people will use it. >> so tradeddu newspaper after-hours trading, would you buy yahoo! at $16? >> you know, we are still a buyer on it. we think there is a fai
telecom equipment makers in the world-- are a threat to u.s. security. >> ifill: we update the presidential race as both candidates compete in battleground states, and we preview the "choice 2012," airing tonight on frontline. >> woodruff: from our climate change series, hari sreenivasan reports on urban areas heating up, and one city's efforts to cool down. >> ifill: and ray suarez has the story of a mexican drug lord killed in a gunfight, and his corpse stolen from the funeral home. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who p
as it seems? erika miller takes a closer look at the data and what it says about the u.s. economy. >> reporter: 3-tenths of a percent does not seem like much. but, when it comes to the nation's unemployment rate, a 3- tenths of a percent drop is actually staggering. the unemployment rate now stands at 7.8 percent. that's the lowest level since january 2009, when president obama took office. even more remarkable is the reason for the drop. >> the unemployment rate decline was not because people dropped out of the labor force. to the contrary. the labor force actually but the household survey estimate of employment increased even more. >> reporter: the household survey shows total employment rose by 873,000. that's the biggest gain since ronald reagan was president. but there's a catch. two-thirds of those jobs are part-time positions, taken because no full-time work was available. and there's another troubling sign: >> what we have is hiring that is concentrated, most recently, in the government sector. hiring that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of posi
to the japanese tech giant taking a major stake in sprint. sprint may have a savior-- it could use help and money from softbank. sprint has been struggling for seven years-- a disastrous merger with nextel, and an expensive tab to modernize its wireless network. but sprint insisted today its talks with softbank are in the early stages. "although there can be no assurances that these discussions will result in any transaction or on what terms any transaction may occur, such a transaction could involve a change of control of sprint." reportedly, softbank would invest nearly $13 billion for a majority stake in sprint. that could go a long way to help sprint compete with rivals at&t and verizon, and pay for its investment in mobile broadband provider clearwire. >> i think the one piece of the puzzle with sprint that was always a little worrisome was their investment in clearwire. so to the extent that helps bolster clearwire, could make sprint an even better investment, but we'll have to see how this encapsulates clearwire, if it does at all. >> susie: michael bowen of pacific crest securities has be
. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama and mitt romney spent this day getting ready for their second debate, where questions will come directly from voters. as they did, new polls underscored what's riding on the outcome. from the obama and romney camp came signs of just how high the stakes will be tomorrow night. republican vice presidential candidate paul ryan talked up the coming confrontation as he campaigned in cin
to be any mercy, which simply probably tells us in a broad sense that stocks are to a large extent almost priced to pfection. p >> susie: corporate america may be down about its future prospects, but american consumers are beginning to feel more upbeat. consumer confidence is at its highest level in seven months. why the disconnect and should investors be concerned aboutme these out of sync views? erika miller reports. >> reporter: for years now, corporate america has been thriving, while consumers have been struggling. but now it seems, the tables have turned. businesses are worrying, while regular americans are feeling more hopeful. first, the worry warts. since the start of earnings season, a host of companies have reported disappoting numbers, including general electric, mcdonalds, google, microsoft and alcoa. across the board, companies arei getting slammed by a weak global economy, particularly in europe. >> we know that the european debt crisis is still highly impacting companies and, for the most part, there's really no sector that's been able to benefit from growth there very bro
tonight, hurricane sandy is ready to make landfall in the u.s., already it's an historic storm, with historic preparations. stock markets closed. and coast lines evacuated with tens of millions of people sitting in the forecast path of the massive storm. sandy is a huge storm expected to come ashore in southern new jersey. but the hurricane force winds have been battering the eastern seaboard for hours. those winds extend out 175 miles from the center of the storm. those winds are pushing the atlantic ocean up and over many coast-lin.. from rhode island, south to the jersey shore. coastal flooding is a significant risk thanks to the storm surge, potentially reaching 11 feet in new york harbor. battery park on the tip of manhattan is under a mandatory evacuation, as waves already have topped the sea wall. low lying areas are at substantial risk of flood water including the wall street area, especially if the worst of the surge hits during high tide tonight, at 9pm eastern time. that threat of flooding was one reason u.s. stock markets were closed today, the first un- i scheduled
gets that $5 trillion number he used again today. governor romney's plan to cut tax rates by 20% would add up to about $5 trillion over ten years, assuming no other changes. but governor romney is planning to make other changes by eliminating tax deductions worth about the same amount. but the president is accurate when he says governor romney is making many promises in his tax plan. romney says upper-income people will not get a net tax cut; middle-income people will not see their taxes go up; incentives for savings and investment won't be touched; the estate tax and alternative minimum tax will be eliminated-- all this while cutting tax rates and not changing the amount of money the federal government brings in. an analysis by the tax policy center shows governor romney will have to make some big tradeoffs. >> so, governor romney has made five promises. he can't keep them all. he is going to have to, at some point, abandon one of those promises. he cannot cut tax rates, cut taxes on the middle class, cut taxes on capital gains, and balance the budget all at once. >> reporter: romney
minority, about 9% of the u.s. electorate, in a tight election, these voters could end up providing the winner with the margin of victory. >> brown: judy woodruff gets an inside view of the financial crisis and the government ba out from former fdic head sheila bair. >> warner: and markhields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.hi >> major funding for the c2 newour has been provided by:c2 ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and carnegie corporation. >> and with the ooing support of these institutions and foundat.nsoi and... friends of the newshou >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. anby contributions to your p station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: lebanon found itself reliving a nightmarish past today after the worst bombing in fr years. at least eit people were killed and nearly 80 wounded in a car-bomb attack.le the explosion rocked central beirut as afternoon rush hour was getting underway, tearing through a m
on that fed decision, diane swonk joins us, she's chief economist at mesirow financial. so, the fed is stking to its plan, no real surprises today. did anything stand out foro you? >> you know, there really wasn't much that stood out. i tnk that was importantat the real issue here is that the fed is still continuing to be sort of a certainty in this ocean of uncertainty for both consumers and investors alike, saying we're willing to leave tha punch bowl out that a little longer than anybody thought and maybe get some people tipsy. >> there wasn't much market reaction to the fed decision. do you think the message of the markets is there is really t much more that the fed can do to ft the economy? >> i don't think the fed is out o bullets at all, nor do they. they think every time they do something, they need to do more. and the federal reserve is certainly going to make another announcement in december to compensate for the end of what they call the twist. chubby checker's song, the twist." they're going to continue to buy more treasury bonds and extend their balance sheet further. the problem
, bringing wind,ain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. a she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the de th toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the storm has affected an estimated one out of every five americans, bringing some business to a standstill over flooding, closed airports, and no public transportation. while rescue efforts continue tonight, early damage estimates are still rough, running between $10 billion a $20 billion,on according to eqecat. hurricane irene did $10 billion damage 14 months ago. >> susie: wall street was closed again today for the second straight day because of hurricane sandy. this is the first two-day weather-related shutdown sin
dependent upon for oil and dependent upon to keep its people from becoming terrorists and trying to kill us. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it.c2 soon, computing intellince innc unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. and with the ongoing suort of these institutions and foundations. and...t this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you.a thank you. >> brown: the countdown to election day brought new jibes, new ads and new urgency today. the presidential contenders and their running mates raced from state to state, lookinto naill down 270 electoral votes with just 13 days to go. for president obam it was the busiest day ye
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting scien, technology, and improved economic performance and financialno literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the giant hybrid storm named sandy left a growing toll today. officials reported at least 39 people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deser
us. >> tom: and why some american manufacturers think an economic slowdown could be on the way. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! it's only october, but at stores around the country, it's beginning to look a lot like christmas. the national retail federation is predicting a 4.1% gain in holiday sales. that would not be as good as last year, but still above the ten-year average. but as erika miller explains, there's greater uncertainty than usual in the forecasts. >> reporter: past the halloween decorations, the candy, and costumes, you will find the artificial trees, wreaths, and tinsel. stores like this kmart are displaying christmas merchandise early, hoping for a greater share of holiday spending. >> they are coming in and looking at the trees and getting the thought in their mind that christmas is coming, and start to think, "what can i start shopping for now?" >> reporter: but forecasters say it's more difficult than usual to predict consumer spending this holiday season. the big wild card is the presidential election. >> this is the most difficult year we've ever ha
on the number one issue for most voters this year: the economy. joining us for the debate, and here with us now to preview what to expect tonight are two familiar faces syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. gentlemen, welcome. the night is finally here. mark, no pressure, just 60 million people will be watching. what are you looking for from tonighta encounter? >> what i'm looking for, judy, is that the-- the candidate who understands of the two that the most important thing is not making a mistake but really making a point as to what his presidency would be about. i think both of them are geared because so much has been-- attention has been directed to gaffes in the past that affected or influenced, shamed the outcome, that impression. it's a magic moment. with no pundits, no prism of edtorm columnists, 60 million individuals sit down in a comparative situation, they make their own assessment. and i think it's a marvelous public exercise. >> woodruff: a magic moment, david? >> we'll see. it is the biggest night of the election. usually the debates have
bounced around today, finally closing down at $92 a barrel on a bigger than expected increase in u.s. supplies. gasoline prices fell and now average $3.75 a gallon. prices at the pump were a hot topic in the presidential debate last night. we talk now about the outlook for energy with gareth lewis-ok davies commodities strategist at b.n.p. paribas. so you heard it last night, the candidates went toe to toe in the debate. governor romney accusing the president that for a doubling of gasoline prices over the last four years president obama defending himself saying it wasn't his fought that there was a recession and a recovery. soho was right here? >> well, really oil prices as a global phenomenon is dependent on what's happening with the world as a whole. so there's a limit to what one country, one government can in terms of oil prices. what we've seen in the united states is oil production in the u.s. is increasing. but due to other factors arou the world and the middle east we're still having higher prices and that's impacting the price of crude. at the moment price of gasoline is be
union will share this year's nobel peace prize. ray suarez interviews the e.u. ambassador to the u.s. >> brown: we come back to politics as paul solman asks this question: >> who do you trust >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the-vice presidential debate left democrats today saying they're back on track after a strong showing. republicans argued their man held his own. instant polls split on who won last night's confrontation, but both camps claimed victory. vice president biden moved on today to wisconsin, paul ryan's home state. >> anyone that watched that debate, i don'
'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, what do the numbers tell us about the true state of the labor market? we get an assessment. >> woodruff: then, gwen ifill reports on missouri's senate contest where the democratic incumbent has unexpectedly grabbed the lead. >> this the united states senate. mark shields an david brooks >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> woodruff: and ray suarez previews another political match to watch, thousands of miles south in venezuela, where long- time leader hugo chavez faces a young challenger. >> the election marks a watershed moment for the world's second largest oil producing nation. and a critical supplier of crude oil to the u.s. its number one customer. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: carnegie corp >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: m
for the control of the u.s. house? governor brown vetoes few of the more than 1,800 bills on his desk, as he presses for support of proposition 30 on the november ballot. and gas jumped as much as 20 cents overnight, with the spike expected to continue. plus, anti-domestic violence leader estra sola on making all violence an issue of global concern, coming up next. >>> good evening, i'm belva davis and welcome to "this week in northern california." on our news panel tonight, dan walters, political column nis for "the sacramento bee." in studio, we have tom vacar, computer editor for ktvu news and josh richman, regional political reporter for the bay asia news group. and joe garofoli, political reporter for "the san francisco chronicle." joe, you were in denver for the first presidential debate. must have been hard covering it, since there were so many people tweeting that night. tell us what's happened since then. how are the candidates -- >> things have really evolved over the last 40 ho8 hours. it was widely perceived that the president did not have a good night. didn't really realize the
- richard haas, president of then council on foreign relatns. he's in chicago.n and in boston, former u.s. diplomat nicholas burns, now with the kennedy school of government at harvard university. welcome to you both. let me just ask you tstart broadly speaking. what do we take away from last night's debate in terms of how well these two candidates understand american foreign policy and would be a good steward of it? let me start with you. nick burns >> well, judy, this may sound startling to say in our present red-blue divided partisan environment but i think we have two impressive people running for president. there botht knowledgeable. they're both very smart about the issues. both of them have been successful in nearly everything they've tried in tir professional lives. president obama was clearly the more knowledgeableir and nuanced and even some's tketed in the way he describedded the challenges to us on the foreign policy and national security landscape. i thought that governor romney had a very strong moment in the debate, a very good moment when he tied together our domestic econ
company. welcome. t'e new gilded age is roaring down on us. an uncaged tiger on a rampage. walk out to the street in front of our office and turn right, and you can see the symbol of it. skyscraper, going up two blocks away. when finished, this high rise among high rises will tower 1,000 feet. the tallest residential building in the city. "the new york times" has dubbed it the global billionaire's club, and for good reason. at least two of the apartments are under contract for more than $90 million each. others, more modest, range in price from $45 million to more than $50 million. simuaneously, the powers that be have just awarded donald trump, yes, that donaldan trum the rightto run a golf course in the bronx which taxpayers are spending at least $97 million to build. what amounts to a public indignant cityhe comptroller for a luxury golf course. good grief. a handout to the pollute contracts. this is a city where economic inequality rivals that of a third world country. of america's 25 largest cities new york is now the most unequal. the median income for the bottom 20% last yea
and a colleague of the late u.s. commissioner of education ernest boyer. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> kathleen, the last time you were here you said all we've got left in the search for truth and knowledge is the debate. all right, are you satisfied now? >> no, we did not get an answer to the question that i wanted answered, which is "what are the sacrifices you're going to ask of us?no where are you going to get the mon that weweeed in a way thatee won't tank the economy, that will incease the likelihood of economic growth?" and so, the problem now facing a the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that ndidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment e.values had something to do wi this? >> well, i think sus ense was what was required down to the wire. s and that's what we got. one won one,
to be building a new foundation. that's according to the latest snapshot of the u.s. economy released today by the federal reserve. the so-called "beige book" compiles data from 12 fed districts, and it shows residential real estate improved in "all" districts in september. anecdotes from business contacts and economists noted existing home sales strengthened, while prices rose or stayed stable. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at whether the broader economy is also showing signs of strength. >> reporter: here's a shocker: the u.s. economy is growing, but only at modest pace. that's what anecdotes, not hard numbers, from the fed's regional banks suggest about the business climate. 10 of the 12 fed districts reported economic activity in september expanded modestly since the last snapshot. only new york and kansas city saw a leveling off or slowing of growth. residential real estate was the one major sweet spot, showing widespread improvement. >> we've seen a pickup in house prices, we've seen a pickup in construction activity, a little bit better demand for loans. so, it generally corrobor
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)